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Anti Vaccination Activist Still Doesn’t Have Polio

Correctness News






Anti Vaccination Activist Still Doesn’t Have Polio

The Correctness Press

A local anti-vaccination activist is suing the Alberta government over “Orwellian vaccination programs” that have left her utterly without a trace of polio.

Whinnie Choad held a press conference today to address her claims that her parents and the medical system “gambled with” her life. “I was only a child, and I had no choice in the matter of my vaccinations,” she said, completely free of polio. “How could they have done this to me? It’s a violation of my human rights”, she continued, standing on her totally undeformed legs.

The Correctness ON TV???

Dearest Remaining Fan:









TBinns and RRT are in this crazy competition to win a TV show from Our National Broadcaster. Please go view it, share it, like it, follow it, review it, relike it, etcetera. If we were paid to bring you content, you’d see more content. For realsies.




12 Unforgettable Texts you can Pretend Someone Accidentally Sent

Boy, texting right? Aren’t we always accidentally sending inconceivably foul come-ons to our loved ones? Notice how naturally it happens? Like, how it happens always, all the time? You know, like how no one just used some text generator to fake their hilarious “mistakes”, and instead actually repeated texted their great grandmother about the quality of their bowel movements at 3 AM?




Changing the Game

I’ve been thinking about game mods lately. For those not in the know, mods are user developed “add-ons” for video games that change the appearance or the features of a game. They’ve grown increasing popular in the last decade, and for some game like Minecraft, they’re pretty much standard for most players.


The thing I love about mods is they represent a brilliant opportunity in the evolution of gaming. They’re an example of the feedback loop in action. The old development cycle was this:

Developer has an idea -> build game -> tests -> release game -> moves on to next project.

But with the advent of online forums and social media, fans are much more vocal about what they want in a game, and while I’m the first to warn content creators about trying to please ALL of the people all of the time, the fans are not only speaking, they’re now creating.


If we think of mods as the individual’s way of responding to the work(the game), mods are essentially a way to add something that was not there, or missing. To that end, while not every mod needs to be embraced and cherished, really popular mods must represent something the players want or need.

Dissenting Opinions

The Correctness has shared a LOT of opinions about pretty much everything we’ve ever discussed. In the pop culture internet world, it’s easy to both find something to have an opinion on, and also to share it. It’s also very, very easy to be lulled in to thinking that the more vocal someone is, the better their opinion is. In a world with Twitter, a thought can be retweeted and parroted instantly around the world, long before it’s thought through or reflected on. Sites with message boards can quickly form a “line” on subjects and excoriate any one who strays from it.